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OLarryR
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Initially Posted - 02/15/2018 :  04:45:03  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
I have given this thought for many years but did nothing about it...except subscribe to the Wooden Boat Magazine many years ago. I was considering building a small wooden sailboat/dinghy - One that I could trailer to a nearby lake or also use in the Potomac River but perhaps different waters than where I have my Cat 25. Then there was the thing about just how much time to have to devote to this versus sail and maintain my Cat 25 and do all the other things that we all do. But I am getting closer to when I expect to retire which will probably be in Spring 2019...~14 mos or so from now.

One of the boats I was considering building was the Penobscot 14 designed by Arch Davis. Turns out that a guy that retired from our office was building this boat and so last Fall, I visited him at his home in Annapolis to see his progress and what lessons learned he had to offer. Firs thing - This guy is a very accomplished woodworker and the level of effort to build the boat appears to be a bit beyond my capabilities. He also recommended that I take an Introduction to Boat Building course up in Brooklin, Maine at the Wooden Boat Association School. he indicated they off great classes and it was like going to adult summer camp.

So, I finally started along this path. I signed up for Introduction to Boatbuilding - a 6 day class covering boatbuilding plans, se of tools and working on building 3 boats by the 11 (max) enrolled in the class. Class is already full ! I got the last slot ! and the class is not for another 5 months !

I also have to bring tools with me...So, I am working off the recommended list and will purchasing stuff that I do not presently have (ie. Low angle plane, low angle spokeshave, sliding T angle bevel, etc.

My thought is to take the course this summer and then next summer, soon after I retire, I will take a Chesapeake Light Craft (CLC) Build Your Own Boat Class that is offered in Annapolis. I have been interested in building other sailboats, not necessarily CLCs but now setting my sights on building a boat of easier construction and most likely in a class setting (working on your own), than tackling a boat that would require more advanced skills with no assistance and/or significantly longer time to complete. Anyway, I noticed that CLC now has a new sailboat dinghy in their line-up. It is rather a small sailboat at 10 feet but it has a more classy look than some of the other boats they offer and from the photos, it has a good sailing posture while sailing.

Anyway, putting the word out that summer of 2019, maybe someone wants to also enroll in a build your own boat class. Who knows...maybe someone out there is also contemplating doing something similar.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Wash DC http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html

Edited by - OLarryR on 02/15/2018 04:48:52

dasreboot
Admiral

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Response Posted - 02/15/2018 :  06:12:41  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
as another wooden boat subscriber i just want to say: You are a bad man!" I can resist anything but temptation.

Oh the boats i have wanted to build. dinghys, perhaps a small tri, one of these. most ive done is a strip built cradle boat for my daughter when she was a baby. Dont think I'll ever get the time. most of my tools are getting dusty waiting for me to stop sailing!

Todd Lewis
Eowyn 87 TR/WK C25 #5656
ARWEN 84 TR/SK C25 #4031
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OLarryR
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Response Posted - 02/15/2018 :  12:39:10  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
If you need some addl temptation and rationale for going forward with boatbuilding, think of it this way:

The concern with not having enough time is a biggy and I am sure that many that start building, never get to complete the boat. A year slips by and then the second year. By then, interest dissipates. So, the best way to be successful at this is first to set smaller goals - A smaller boat and of simpler construction. Then not starting from plans alone, since a big delay factor would be rounding up all the supplies/wood/parts, etc from the appropriate vendors. Buying a kit (ie. Shell boats, etc) is a way to go. Not all kits are equal. Shell Boats has complete kits and all parts dimensionally cut. But there are other kits that are really partial kits leaving it to you to round up the addl supplies, etc and only bulk wood supplied - You do all cutting. make a mistake and then you are on your own. The individuals or small companies that seel kits will provide assistance via telephone or EMail....mostly EMail. But going with a kit does save time.

The ultimate but you have to compromise on just what boats are available this way is to buy a kit and sign up for the mfrs class to build the boat. Chesapeake Light Craft is one of those companies that offers classes. You have a more limted selection of boats based on the classes they offer and only for their boats, however, it is a terrific time saver and many going this route probably wind up completing their boats since most work and the hardest parts are done during the class. Going with a class, you also do not have to buy all the clamps and some other necessities which can be shared in the class. The biggest thing is that if you do not have time to build a boat.....now you have the rationale for going forward and building one. The boat will be well on it's way toward completion by taking the class. That means in one week, you go from not having time to build a boat...to having a boat.

Take a look at CLC's Tenderly Dinghy, one of their latest offerings. They have a time lapse video of one of the classes to build this boat. It goes all the way from no hull to a hull that has the dagger board trunk installed and fiberglas cloth resin that has already been applied to the hull, inside and out. All that basically remains is sanding, painting, install of fittings....not much more !! Biggest thing is that rather than aving to find the time during a whole year to build a boat, in one week, you have one on the side of your house and then even if you spend a few hours each week, it is not going to take that long to complete it.

?

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Wash DC http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html

Edited by - OLarryR on 02/15/2018 12:42:58
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HappyNow
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Response Posted - 02/15/2018 :  13:05:24  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Larry, I built a Sailfish from plans, I believe GlenL, when I was in high school, 1970. The plans had full size cutouts to make the stringers by tracing around them. I used clear pine and marine plywood and mahogany for the rudder and centerboard and hand rails. I remember my high school girlfriend was mad because I spent my week's paycheck on brass screws and nails rather than a birthday present for her. What a great feeling when you put it in the water for the first time and sail away. I strongly encourage you to do it. I ended up trading it for a Lightning and I still regret that. Good luck!

Michael Levin
Sailin' on Sunshine
C250 #402 WK
Lake Tahoe
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OLarryR
Master Marine Consultant

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3141 Posts

Response Posted - 02/16/2018 :  04:34:51  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
When I visited this guy who retired from my office and is in the midst of completing a Penobscot 14, he indicated that for holidays or birthdays, he buys his spouse, jewelry, and she buys him top end woodworking tools. So, a win-win for both of them !!

Thanks for the encouragement. I am taking it one step at a time. Taking the boatbuilding class first - I have reviewed boatbuilding plans in books and also went over them with the guy that is completing his project. I have a better feel but that is one area I want to learn more about. Also, the boatbuilder I visited, even though it was clear to me that he was an exceptional woodworker, he indicated that when it comes to using block planes, he has learned a lot on fine tuning his use of that tool and that was one reason he recommended I take the boatbuilding class before building my own boat.

By the way, there are 11 in this class and at completion of the class, they will be raffling off 1 or 2 of the boats we will be working on. You have to pay for the matls but you get all the workmanship for free. But the issue is that you are responsible for having it shipped home or trailering it home. I will be travelling by commercial air and as far as shipping....I believe it will be cost prohibitive. So...I will most likely opt out of the raffle. ...We'll see....I could change my mind.

I am pretty certain I will be building my own starting summer of 2019. I am in the zone - I already came thru signing up for this boatbuilding class this summer....and so the momentum for following thru has started with the paying for this course.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Wash DC http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html
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Stinkpotter
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Djibouti
7807 Posts

Response Posted - 02/16/2018 :  08:27:17  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by HappyNow

Larry, I built a Sailfish from plans, I believe GlenL, when I was in high school, 1970... I used clear pine and marine plywood and mahogany for the rudder and centerboard and hand rails...
I did the same in about 6th-7th grade--clear white pine, Masonite, and fiberglass--plans from some magazine. The biggest challenges were rip-sawing the side rails and keel to taper them, and getting the finished hull out of the basement! The lateen sail was cotton duck on bamboo spars--when anyone dumped the boat, it became impossible to sail until the sail dried out. (That was my dad--we had to drop the sail and tow him home.)

There's nothing like sailing a boat you built yourself, even if it's just 10' long!

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic, CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage
Now on Eastern 27 Sarge (but still sailing when I can).

Passage, Mystic, and Sarge--click to enlarge.
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islander
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Response Posted - 02/16/2018 :  09:12:56  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
Larry I admire your drive to do this. I think your really going to enjoy it. I built a small boat once but unlike Dave getting it out of the basement, My problem was getting it into the bottle.

Scott-"IMPULSE"87'C25/SR/WK/Din.#5688
Sailing out of Glen Cove,L.I Sound


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Derek Crawford
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Response Posted - 02/16/2018 :  09:37:30  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I once helped my friend build a boat in his basement. Once it was finished we had to remove a whole window and frame to get it out of the basement. I don't know what brand it was (I wasn't a sailor at that time) but it sure sailed nice.

Derek Crawford
Chief Measurer C25-250 2008
Previous owner of "This Side UP"
1981 C-25 TR/FK #2262 Used to have an '89 C22 #9483, "Downsized"
San Antonio, Texas
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OLarryR
Master Marine Consultant

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3141 Posts

Response Posted - 02/16/2018 :  09:45:44  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Dave/Derek/Scott - Funny - Getting it out of the basement or getting it into a bottle. I am certain I have seen a cartoon many years ago showing a guy that built something and then it was obvious that he did not do all the planning because there was no way to get it out of the basement/room.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Wash DC http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html
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Stinkpotter
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Djibouti
7807 Posts

Response Posted - 02/17/2018 :  10:32:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
As I recall, I just had to remove a stairway railing and some posts that held it. A big "octopus" furnace added to the challenge...

Dave Bristle
Association "Port Captain" for Mystic, CT
PO of 1985 C-25 SR/FK #5032 Passage
Now on Eastern 27 Sarge (but still sailing when I can).

Passage, Mystic, and Sarge--click to enlarge.
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Voyager
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Response Posted - 02/18/2018 :  15:46:05  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I enjoy reading about wooden boatbuilding and I donated to a group in Boston that teaches inner city kids to build small plywood boats. They raffled off last year's boats at the New England Boat Show. "Teach a man to fish..."
I also enjoy watching Tips from a Shipwright on YouTube with Louis Sauzedde who's got a boat building shop in Wickford RI, just a stones throw from Newport and Jamestown on the Narragansett Bay.
He built a wooden fishing boat about 20 feet last winter and now he's working on a dory. He's got a fantastic shop full of bandsaws, planers, long benches, and he uses a variety of hand tools and power tools very judiciously. I dabble in woodworking and I love to watch him finesse the curves and bends.
I too subscribed to Wooden Boat and have contemplated joining a class maybe next winter to build a stitch and glue wooden kayak.
There's nothing quite like building a thing of utility and beauty and using it while also showing it off.

Bruce Ross
Passage ~ SR-FK ~ C25 #5032

Port Captain Stratford & Milford, CT
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OLarryR
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Response Posted - 02/21/2018 :  04:42:36  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
When they sent me the confirmation for the class this summer, it also had a list of tools that the instructor recommended everyone attending is to bring to the class. Thank goodness, no table saws or heavy power tools were on the list. Even so, I am looking over the list and considering how to keep the weight down in my 1 bag of luggage and carry-on - Don't want to trigger extra baggage charges on the plane flight.

While the instructor indicated that there was no need to buy expensive tools, the fact is that some of the tools are extremely important in boatbuilding and so I am looking at getting some that are of high quality...thinking optimistically, that the next summer I will be using them in the build for my own boat.

So, on the list are tools such as Spokeshave, low angle block plane, T-Sliding angle bevel, cross-cut saw, mallet, claw hammer, folding ruler, tape measure, etc. The Spokeshave, cross-cut saw and the low angle block plane, I will probably purchase form Veritas. This mfr makes fairly decent woodworking tools. Also considering Lie Nielsen but the costs are quite high. You could buy a low angle block plane on Amazon from a bunch of mfrs at much lower cost (ie. $25). But I read a lot of reviews and going a bit higher quality for some tools. The measuring tape - I have one from Harbor Freight, that will do ! The hammer, I am going to reduce bulkiness and luggage weight leaving my full size Estwing home and instead, opted for a short hammer but with a sort of full size head (made by Klein) from Amazon for about $10. When they see this hammer, I am sure I will get comments since it's full length is only about 6"-8" long. Pretty shrimpy.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Wash DC http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html

Edited by - OLarryR on 02/21/2018 05:28:02
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RichardG
Admiral

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957 Posts

Response Posted - 02/22/2018 :  17:51:31  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I also understand this drive. I have been lusting after the kit for the Sassafras 12, also from CLC, to replace the plastic kayak I have been using for years. It seems the full kit includes all materials, all pieces precut, is one of the easier boats to build and requires less tools (mainly lots and lots of spring clamps). Someday...



RichardG 81 FK/SR #2657
Terminal Island, CA
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Leon Sisson
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Response Posted - 05/25/2018 :  13:28:14  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
If you want to combine scratching your home boat building itch with improving the versatility of your Catalina, then consider building a dinghy.

I built the 8' D4. For the balanced lug sailing rig, I modified a sailboard mast, made 1x2 fir boom and gaff, and cut down some generic daysailer sail I had laying around.

If I build another dinghy, I'm leaning towards the Spindrift S11-N which is an 11' nesting (2-part) dinghy. [http://bandbyachtdesigns.com/spindrift] Building a nesting Spindrift would be a bit more challenging than the D4, but I'm sure I would be happier with the finished boat.

To me, some of those tools listed for the boat building class seem exceedingly traditional. I used: hand-held 7" circular saw, hand-held power jigsaw, 7" disk sander (almost essential, and a 5" orbital disk would be helpful too), router, 3/8" cord drill to abuse as a drum sander for details, and the absolutely indispensable cordless 3/8" drill/screw gun (get a good one). I also have in my shop a drill press, 10" table saw, and 1/2" table router, but they're not essential. A band saw would have come in handy. Maybe a 'cheese grater' plane/rasp for fairing partially cured epoxy fairing putty on convex surfaces. If I was feeling fanatical about fairing, then thin plywood or fiberglass long-boards with peelable sandpaper adhesive. (No hand planes, spoke shaves, etc.)

I encourage those considering building a boat to start with a very detailed spreadsheet of costs. It wasn't cheap. Don't use polyester or cheap no-name epoxy resin. I used WEST System, but at least get resin with an established reputation among boat builders. Fiberglass all plywood surfaces to avoid checking and cracking. In areas not subject to abrasion, use extremely thin cloth. Don't use exterior grade plywood to save money; special order thin marine plywood. Be fanatical about keeping weight down at every step along the way. My D4 ended up more that 50% heavier than expected, which detracts from its usefulness.

-- Leon Sisson
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GaryB
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Response Posted - 05/25/2018 :  15:47:43  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
quote:
Originally posted by HappyNow

Larry, I built a Sailfish from plans, I believe GlenL, when I was in high school, 1970. The plans had full size cutouts to make the stringers by tracing around them. I used clear pine and marine plywood and mahogany for the rudder and centerboard and hand rails. I remember my high school girlfriend was mad because I spent my week's paycheck on brass screws and nails rather than a birthday present for her. What a great feeling when you put it in the water for the first time and sail away. I strongly encourage you to do it. I ended up trading it for a Lightning and I still regret that. Good luck!


My first sailboat was a used Sailfish my parents bought for me when I was in high school. Had a lot of fun learning to sail with that boat.

It always weighed double what it did when I launched it. I lived about 25 minutes from the lake and it was usually just about drained completely when I got home! LOL

Went from the old wooden sailfish to a brand new Hobie 16 a couple of years later when I graduated from HS.


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GaryB
Andiamo
'89 SR/WK #5862
Kemah,TX
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panhead1948
Captain

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Response Posted - 05/27/2018 :  11:06:52  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
I would recommend you check out Chesapeake Light Craft
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OLarryR
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Response Posted - 05/29/2018 :  03:24:20  Show Profile  Visit OLarryR's Homepage  Reply with Quote
Chesapeake Light Craft (CLC) is closest to me since it is in Annapolis, about a 60-90 minute drive from Northern VA. They have a fairly new kit/class called a Tenderly Dinghy. It is only about 10 ft but has some nice details. I am starting off with the basic boatbuilding course at the Wooden Boat School in Brooklin Maine which I signed up for 22-28JUL18. Just booked my air flights last night. While they raffle off 1-2 of the boats built in the class of 11 attending "adult summer camp", probably too expensive to have one shipped from Maine since I won't have my car with me if I actually won the raffle and had a trailer. But plan was to take this class and then next year, after I retire planned for next Spring, I'll probably take one of the CLC courses to build your own Tenderly Dinghy unless I find a different sailboat to my liking. My first choice would have been Arch Davis's Penobscot 14 but after seeing one under construction last year, the construction looks a bit too intense for me to start off with that boat. They do offer it has a 2 week class and raffle one to those attending the course but most build it from a kit without the class.

Gary - Interesting how we all started off. I recall sailing in my friend's old , used Flying Junior 13'. Then when I started working, I bought a brand new Banshee 13' which was similar to a Laser in construction. I used to also get drenched in that boat and the cockpit would fill with water. I recall buying a self-bailer and to mount it cut a rectangular hole in the bottom of the hull. When you used it and it worked perfectly, you would unlock it as you were travelling fast and the little flap that kept most water from coming in when waters were calm, would flip open when sailing and the water in the cockpit would basically get sucked out the bailer.

Larry
'89 Robin's Nest#5820, Potomac River/Wash DC http://catalina25.homestead.com/olarryr.html

Edited by - OLarryR on 05/29/2018 03:26:09
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GaryB
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Response Posted - 06/06/2018 :  19:43:51  Show Profile  Reply with Quote
http://sailingtexas.com/201801/schesapeake18106.html


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GaryB
Andiamo
'89 SR/WK #5862
Kemah,TX
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